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Jan
27
2012
How Good Is Your Memory: Three Reasons to Record Your Calls Mary Williams

Some people have eidetic, or photographic, memory. They can recall almost everything they’ve ever seen, heard, or read. These special people could attend or host a conference call, remember everything that was said, and go on with their day.  So, for the rest of us, here are three reasons why recording your calls is really important:

  • Not everyone has a photographic memory.

Convincing someone with a fuzzy recall how a meeting actually happened is frustrating. Save time, effort (and even friendships) by recording every call.  If a dispute arises on what was said during a meeting, simply play back the recording.

  • Not everyone is honest.

Admit it. You have been double crossed by a verbal agreement before.  It's your word against theirs. With a recording of the conversation, all doubt is removed.

  • Not everyone remembers what they are supposed to do.

After a meeting, people can be excited about moving forward. After lunch, the excitement starts to fade, and so does memory of any task. Recordings can be used on important meetings to distribute tasks and keep people accountable. Also, the meeting manager can revisit the recording to make sure follow-up occurs with everyone.

Tip: You can notate each call on your account. This way you will know at a glance what the call was about. (Read More About Call Notes)

Think of all the meetings, emails, conversations, questions, and misunderstandings you can avoid just by putting your exact words in a recording. It’s like a bit of photographic memory for all of us.

Never recorded your call before? Here are three ways you can get started:

  • Automatic Recording – Automatically record your conference call each time it starts. Log into your account, go to Conference Manager > View Conference Conference > Name. Select “Automatically Record Conference” under the Detail/Options tab. Done.
  • From Your Phone – Press *2 anytime to start/stop recording.
  • Live Call Screen – Ever notice the “Record button” on your live call screen? Click that button to start/stop recording.
  • Recording Advantages – See more about how you can use your conference recordings in sales, marketing, and customer service.

Jan
26
2012
Press Conference Management and Etiquette (For Everyone) Maranda Gibson

As a baseball fan, we recently had a very exciting thing happen for the Texas Rangers. Japanese pitching sensation Yu Darvish signed a six year deal to come to Texas and play with our Rangers. During the announcement press conference, I noticed something that was really pleasant - everyone involved did a great job of explaining the feelings of the baseball club, and speaking for the not present Darvish.

I've heard bad press conferences where everyone speaks over each other and it doesn't seem like there's any information, but this conference went very well. There were some things I noticed during the conference that stood out as some best practices for press conference management.

  • Define an overall message of the press conference and stick to it throughout the press conference. Press conferences are supposed to promote the idea of cohesive thoughts and show how different individuals, departments, or agencies are working together.
  • Everyone has a specific topic to discuss and they should stick to it. Let the people who are in charge of certain departments speak on those departments - it builds trust with the reporters and the audience.
  • Don't talk over each other. Commenting officials should answer the questions related to their topic.  If you speak up when someone else is talking {because pauses can get confusing} save your point until the first person is really finished.
  • Show some love to the reporters in the back. When taking questions, make sure you take some from the reporters in the back. Smaller publications usually don't receive top billing at these kinds of conferences, so it might be a good show of faith to show a little love to the reporters in the back. 
  • Be thorough but respectful of time limitations.  Yes you want to answer all of the questions but in a crisis, you're working against deadlines as well. While it's important to inform the public of a situation it is equally important to handle the situation. Set a time limit (usually 20 or 30 minutes) and stick to it.


What do you think makes for a good press conference? Are there any specifics like these that you'd want to add, or do many things depend on the nature of the conference itself?

Jan
23
2012
Distance Learning Not Just For College Students Maranda Gibson

With budget shortfalls affecting school districts across the United States, a lot of public schools are turning to virtual learning to ease some of the burden of these shortfalls.

When I started researching for this blog post I found that here in Texas, we have the Texas Virtual Academy, which is 100% supported and accredited by our school districts. I did some quick asking around in the office and found out that one of our operators has a child that started the program this year. I talked to him to give me some of his first impressions about the program.

What's Cool

  • Approved curriculum from the school district
  • Monitoring tools to keep kids accountable
  • Materials provided go well beyond text books. He informed me that not only did the school provide his child a preloaded desktop computer, they also threw in jump ropes and yoga balls for PE, as well as beakers for chemistry assignments.
  • There are also no additional grading requirements. Meaning all of the grades are submitted directly to the district - so there is no additional information for the parents to fill out or send in.
  • More one on one attention from the teachers and students are required to do at least six hours of logged work per day.

The ideas of distance learning are not exclusive to the state of Texas. In fact, a lot of school districts are embracing these ideas as financial burdens begin to affect the ability to hire more educators. Distance learning isn't just about saving money, it also exposes students to different teachers and classroom set ups.

Imagine the student that attends a large school district where the student to teacher ratio is 30:1 and this student struggles in the subject of Math. Now take that same student and virtually connect him or her to a classroom in small town America where the student to teacher ratio is 15:1. I wonder if the extra attention might help to boost this students grades.

We have an education system that if full of different perspectives and loyal educators. Embracing distance learning is going to give students the chance to be exposed to a number of the different kinds of classroom experiences.

What do you think about the potential benefits or drawbacks of distance learning?

Jan
12
2012
Conference Call Services to Try in 2012 Maranda Gibson

Teleconferences have changed since they were first introduced. They have come far beyond on the "audio meeting" to become a potentially integral part of your business and sales strategy. We put our heads together and thought of some other ways that conference call services could be used to interview employees, make new sales connections, and a lot of other really awesome things.

  1. Operator Assistance - An operator will take over all of the technical aspects of the call. They will also prepare a unique introduction to your conference call. Not only is this a great way to create some formality on the call, it's also a great way to relieve some of the stress from the moderator.
  2. Host a Sales Presentation via Web Conference - Instead of driving across town or hopping on a plane to pitch your next client, try using a simple web conference. Put together a PowerPoint presentation and stay in your office. You can still field questions and show growth potential, you're just doing it from the comfort of your favorite chair.
  3. Don't Travel for One Month - In the same vein as the previous tip, plan on keeping the wheels down for an entire month. Limiting travel will not only save you money but grant a different perspective on how you can manage your business. A lot of companies don't realize how easy it is to use conferencing and limit the travel.
  4. Host a Job Interview via Conference Call - Typically, the beginning of the year is when companies start bringing in new employees. Instead of the typical face to face interview, have the initial interview over the phone. You'll hear how the potential employee handles themselves when all they have are their words and tone of voice to back them up.
  5. Interview a Leader From Your Industry - Use a conference service to record the interview and then turn it into a podcast and host it on your blog. Simple as that.
  6. Telecommuter Friday - This may sound crazy but it could be a good experience for you and your employees. If your businesses allows (some won't, like retail) pick one Friday as a test and let your employees telecommute. Many companies successfully operate in a virtual office environment and end up saving money without the need for office space, phone lines, etc.
  7. Invite Your Customers to a Q&A Session - Try a monthly or quarterly call with your customers to see what they think of any changes or updates you've made to your products. This is an exceptionally great idea for start ups that usually make a lot of changes right away and rely on feedback from the public to know what is working and what isn't.
  8. Add a PowerPoint to a Status Meeting - Punch up your next boring old status meeting by adding in a PowerPoint. Suddenly, an audible list of sales numbers, increases, and projections become colorful and memorable graphs and charts. Using visuals reaches out and grabs the audience’s attention to keep the focus on the meeting and nothing else.
  9. Use a Registration Page - Trying to see who is attending a status meeting? Want to know what potential client attended one of your web conferences? Set up registration pages and collect information like name, email, or phone number. It gives you the ability to see who joined the conference, who didn't, and once you download the registration list, it's a marketing contact sheet that immediately lets you see who is interested in learning more about your products.
  10. Invite the Press to Your Company Announcement - We recommend that you use this tip in conjunction with the operator assistance suggestion. Inviting the press to an announcement is a good way to generate buzz, get a little excitement about a project, or gain a little extra news coverage.

In 2012, we highly encourage you to try one (or more) of these uses of your conferencing services. You might be surprised that a lot of people use conference calls for these very reasons and that it works very well.

Jan
03
2012
Verbal Communication Styles Maranda Gibson

It is generally accepted that there are four different kinds of verbal communication styles. Each person will have their own way of approaching projects and while one particular communication style will stand out among the different attributes, most of us will have a combination of both. The kind of communicator affects the way they see different aspects of their job, how they react to change, and how they may interact with their co-workers. While reading over these I also realized that the type you relate most with could have some bearing on your presentations. Here's a brief overview of the communication styles and some things you can improve once you know your type.

Relator - The relator is the team player in the office. They dislike conflict and are hesitant towards change (but not necessarily against) because it will throw off their daily routine. They are easy to work with, take direction well, and are always willing to listen to others. While they always have the best interests of their co-workers at heart their work can sometimes be affected by the need for their co-workers to be happy.

When planning a presentation as a Relator keep in mind that you have no ability to please everyone who is listening to you. There will be someone in the audience who has heard what you're saying before or won't "get it". Instead, focus on the audience as a whole and encourage them to participate throughout the presentation.

Socializers - These employees are energetic motivators in the office. They enjoy brainstorming meetings and look ahead to the bigger picture. They are excited about where a company can end up but might lose some of the small details along the way.

The Socializer should take care when planning a presentation to include the small details. If you're going through a long and complicated process of how to make a particular change with in an organization, be sure that you document everything that you did to achieve success.

Thinkers - They value logic and details. They can approach a problem and provide a lot of solutions and contingency plans. While they are not opposed to change, it will take some time for them to get used to.

Where the socializer needs to include more details, if you're the thinker you should include a little less in your presentations. It's your nature to include every step along the way, but maybe you need to simplify your presentations a bit and give the option to contact you if they need more information.

Directors - These are the "no-nonsense" folks in the office. They get right down to business and can sometimes be blinded by their own personal goals. While their eyes are on the "bigger picture" they may have unrealistic expectations of how to get there.

If you're a director work on your presentation opening. Sure you desire getting down to business but take a couple of extra minutes to open with a good morning and some polite chatting with your audience. It will make them more receptive to what you have to say.

After reading these, I'm pretty sure that I'm a mixture of the Relator, the Socializer, and the Thinker - with my standout category being the Relator. I am not opposed to change and, in fact, welcome it, but I do require some time to adjust to it. I love to brainstorm with a group and I enjoy conversations that lay out different opinions and thoughts. The thing that stands out the most about me is that I am a "team player". I am strongly opposed to conflict and, in the past, my work has been affected by the need for everyone to be happy and satisfied in their job. What combination are you and which one stands out the most?

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