AccuConferenceAccuConference

Jan
15
2009
5 Tips for Unique Corporate Presentations Maranda Gibson

The problem with using the best technology, the best techniques, is that soon enough you'll look like every other go-getter. This doesn't mean these things are bad. It just means that you have to use them intelligently to go from mediocre to unique.

Michael Hyatt, CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishing sees a lot of presentations. Unfortunately, these presentations aren't all good. No, most are just downright bad. In his blog, From Where I Sit, he gives us five rules for better presentations.

The first rule is obvious, so obvious that it's understandable that we've strayed from it. The rule is to remember that the main focus of a presentation is not PowerPoint, graphics, or gimmicks, it's you the speaker. Those other things are there to augment you and your message.

Which sounds more appealing: a lecture or a story? Why can't a lecture be a story? A presentation should have a natural flow going from point to point. It will provide structure and help your audience follow you better. Plus, it's much more interesting to listen to the struggle, downfall, and ascension to triumph of your company's last quarter than pointing to a graph and rattling off some numbers.

The next two rules concern your video presentation support materials, otherwise known as your PowerPoint presentation. These are great to instantly send a message to your audience. However, there is danger in deciding which messages, and how much of each to display. Always remember "Less is more." Constrict text to a few lines per slide, and make it large so everyone can see without squinting.

Hyatt agrees that handouts are a good thing, but with a caveat. Instead of handing them out before your presentation (basically giving your presentation away), or during your presentation (distracting from and derailing your flow), pass around handouts at the end. It reinforces your message, and helps in case your audience missed something. But don't confuse an agenda with presentation notes. An agenda tells the audience the purpose of the presentation, and provides signposts to guide them. Your handouts will point out scenic views and important landmarks, filling in the back story after you have passed by.

Of course with web conferencing, you have to adjust to the fact that your audience members are spread throughout the world. This doesn't mean you can't distribute handouts, in fact because everyone is already at their computer it's as simple as emailing a Word document as you are ending your presentation, or putting a link in the chat window.

Posted by George Page, Communication Specialist

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