5 Tips to Improve Presentation Communication

When it comes to communicating through a webinar, it's important to remember that when one of your senses is numbed, the others become more aware. When you can't see someone's face while they are speaking, your body's natural inclination is that the other senses become more heightened and aware. So when you take away the face to face aspect of things, your brain begins to attach more to what is being said rather than just how you look.

So when it comes to presentations where people can only hear your voice and see a carefully crafted slide presentation, what are some things that you can do to ensure that your communication skills (and not just your keen knack for slide design) are noticed? Preparation is the heart and soul of any good presentation. Here are some helpful hints that will help create long lasting presentations that are not only informative but can help you keep your participants' attention.

  1. Anticipate Questions:The core of any good communicator is to provide information with a confident voice. There is no crystal ball that's going to tell you what your participants might ask, but you can anticipate certain questions. For example, if you're hosting a call regarding revenue growth or decline, it's a pretty good guess that someone might ask about numbers for a particular location. Have those numbers ready on a print out or up on the computer so that you don't have to keep that question on hold. Being prepared is the cornerstone of a good presentation.
  2. Brainstorm:Brainstorming is pivotal to any presentation, and building slides should not be the only brainstorming process. When you use the slides to brainstorm your ideas, the presentation often comes out looking messy or disorganized. Grab a legal pad and take notes. Define who your audience is, what idea are you trying to convey with this conference, and so forth. Get that down on paper and it will help to keep your flow moving smoothly and will allow you to have a confident and organized presentation.
  3. Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse.According to Nancy Duarte, author of slide:ology: The Art of Science Creating Great Presentations, this is key to any good presentation. You should always rehearse in front of a group that is familiar with the content as well as a group that is not. The reason for this is that the group who is unfamiliar with the presentation content is going to be more likely to pick up on any confusing phrases or terminology. The group who works with the content of the presentation is going to understand everything you are saying, so they are more likely to pick up on errors in the slide presentation itself, rather than the content. Always ask for feedback and find out what people were connecting with, ask what was easy to understand, what wasn't, and make sure those responses are turned to your audience. Nancy says "rehearse until you've NAILED it".
  4. Group presentations should be group developmentsGuest speakers and different departmental members can be valued contributors to any conference. When inviting other people to present on a conference it's important that everyone has a couple of brainstorming sessions together. It helps the flow of ideas moving smoothly. If everyone can put their opinions on how the presentation should move and change, then it will not only sound better, but it will look better too. Color schemes on the slide shows should be the same with each speaker. By doing this, you will ensure that your presentation looks uniform and professional.
  5. Slide text should only be used to keep everyone on task and not as a script.
    Presenters should never read verbatim from slide text. Not only would it look as though you were unprepared, it would be boring. No one wants to just be droned on to from direct readings on a page or slide. The text on the slides should be used more as headers, directing the participants from topic to topic. Keep your audience engaged by using the slides as the visual element of a great presentation and don’t rely on them to provide the substance.
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