How to Download Recordings

There are a few ways to download your audio conference recordings from AccuConference. For no charge, you can record your conference calls and they will be available on your customer account to download for thirty days. One of the things we get asked about is how to download the recordings from the customer account. Not just where they can be found but actually where do they go once you click on them.

There are a few ways you can download our recording files (or most files) from a website. Here’s how you get your conference recordings from our site.

Click directly on “Save”

When you click directly on “Save” the file will go to your “Downloads” folder on your computer. This is a special file designated by your preferred web browser to store any of the things you get from different websites.

When you download a recording directly from our website by clicking on “Save” the file will usually go into that folder. It might pop up on a bar at the bottom of your browser and you can double click and play the file or click and drag it to your desktop to save it there.

Right Click and Select “Save Link As” from the Pop Up Menu

This method allows you to save the file in a specific location, rather than having it go directly into your “Downloads” folder on your computer.

After you click on “Save Link As”, you will be able to choose a folder or location on your computer. You can create a folder on your desktop for your conference recordings or save them directly to a shared drive and make them available for all of your co-workers.

Recording your conference calls is a great way to keep everyone accountable and once you have the file on your computer, they are yours forever. You can use them for podcasts, put them on your website, or have them transcribed to meet any disclosure requirements. What will you do with your conference recordings?

How to Learn From the Internet

This is part two of our series on learning new things. This post talks about how you can use internet resources to learn about most anything. Follow the links after the post to read the other parts of our series.

My interest in weather goes way back to the early 90s when our Carolina home was nearly hit by a tornado. We went down to the basement to take shelter and when we came out, the green storage shed behind our house was gone. We never saw it again. As a kid, it’s hard to understand how something that was there just wasn’t anymore and my dad explained it to me in a very grown up way. He explained to me how he had seen the tornado in the woods just outside the back door while we were in the basement, and how it ‘took’ the shed.

Having my dad explain it to me the way he would any other grown up was great, but it woke up extra fear inside of me. I understood the importance of going to the basement and taking cover, because things can change in an instant with storms. What if the tornado had been just six feet to the left? Would our house still be there? Would our things still be there?

Before the Internet, the research that you could do on your own only went so far. What’s been amazing is information that twenty years ago I could have only seen in a classroom setting is now at the tips of my fingers.

So you want to learn something from the internet? There are a ton of resources out there to teach you pretty much anything. I wanted to learn about the weather, so that’s what I’ve shown you here, but you can mimic these tricks for anything from basket weaving to computer programming.

Reading

The free flow of information lends itself to the ability to let the internet serve as a historical archive. You type something into Google or your search engine of choice and you’re suddenly flooded with news articles, photos, and even historical archives. Go to your search engine of choice and type in “weather history 1998” or “tornado data 2012”. If your interest isn’t weather, you can type in whatever you want and find some truly legitimate information. Here’s a list of some of my favorite weather related reading sites:

Watching

Severe weather events happen so quickly that a meteorologist must warn you at the same time that they try to educate you about the dangers of the incoming weather. When you watch coverage live, it’s like getting the most elementary crash course of your life. I highly encourage anyone who is interested in learning about the weather to watch live coverage, or go to YouTube and find recorded coverage of an old event. To find live streaming of a current weather event, do what I do: search for “major city + live TV” and go to each of the local affiliates to see live events.

Some of the more informative live events are archived below. These large outbreaks allow you to learn a lot very quickly.

Online Classes and Podcasts

If you’re trying to use the internet as an educational tool, then you need to know the opportunities that exist online. I’ve found that weather is one of the easiest subjects to research and learn about, and that there are a lot of “enthusiasts” out there, putting together great educational tools, but for most subjects of interest you can find what you’re looking for. For weather, I’ve found some great classes and online resources that not only define terms or give historical data, but help you get an insider’s view on what you should learn about.

I think no matter what you want to learn about there are a number of reputable places online where you can go and find the information you want. I taught myself everything I know about the weather from these resources, and if you have a subject of interest, I strongly believe you can find what you’re looking for.


You can find the other parts of our learning new things series by following the links below:

Part One: Three Different Ways We Can Teach Ourselves - By Mary Williams.

Part Three: Why We Are Afraid to Try New Things - By David Byrd.