Body Language "Speaks" Volumes During Video Conference

If you and your staff are new to video conferencing, you might want to take a refresher course in the importance of proper body language. During a video conference, if your mouth is saying one thing but your body is saying something else, viewers are going to be confused about your message. The non-verbal cues we give and receive during a conversation can have a powerful impact on the message we take away from a meeting. It's important that your body language reinforces what you are saying during a video conference.

Here are a few tips for projecting good non-verbal cues and reading the body language of others:

  • Eye contact holds the listener's attention and expresses interest, sincerity and confidence.
  • Lack of eye contact implies dishonesty, furtiveness, discomfort or lack of confidence.
  • Smiling when you speak focuses attention on you. People respond positively to smiling faces. Smiling also decreases tension and projects friendliness, acceptance and cooperation.
  • A furrowed brow or frown indicates disagreement, tension, discomfort or confusion.
  • Relaxed arms and open palms suggest honesty, acceptance and a desire to negotiate.
  • Crossed arms or balled fists indicate disagreement, tension, refusal or anger.
  • Leaning forward signals concentration, interest, concern, acceptance and approval.
  • Leaning backward signals resistance, doubt, disinterest or dismissal.
blog comments powered by Disqus
AccuConference | Are You Too Negative?

Are You Too Negative?

As a boss, is it hard for you to hear other opinions? Is it too difficult for you to accept suggestions from other people, especially your employees? When a client suggests you make a change in your operations or policies, do you instantly discard the idea?

What follows are some tips for becoming a more positive, interactive communicator.

1. Stop yourself before you go rogue negative. An instant reaction just is not worth it. Think before you instantly discard anyone else's feedback or ideas. When you stop to consider and think about your reaction, people will appreciate you taking them seriously.

2. Realize that people do want you to succeed. If people are giving you suggestions for improvements for your company, better policies, or streamlining day-to-day processes, recognize that they have your best interest at heart. Sure, some folks can be snarky and demeaning, but for the most part if someone brings it up, they're trying to help you.

3. Be open to off-the-wall ideas. Some of the best ideas coming your way might appear to be lame and genuinely ill formed, but before you quickly and instantly reject them, consider how you might refashion some of these ideas into workable solutions. Be open to fresh, unconventional ideas always.

4. Don't forsake your gut. Don't take on suggestions willy-nilly without really understanding why and how they will be implemented. If you have a check about a certain idea, you are the boss. Your job is not only to act on good advice, but also to ignore and refuse to act on bad advice. Simply listening to a plethora of ideas does not mean you have to take action on every single one. Chances are you'll only actually entertain about 10% of the ideas you hear. That's a healthy percentage.

5. Confirm with trusted confidants. Your board of directors or trusted group of likeminded business owners can help you weed out the good from the bad. If it's a truly good idea, others will think so, and they will bring up every aspect they can in order to help you decide. A trusted group of advisors can see right through the scams of the amateur; they can also know when to take that amateur idea and make it go pro!

All in all, thinking about your response and allowing yourself to be open to communication tactics and ideas you might not have otherwise entertained may not be something you've ever considered before. Maybe now is a good time.

blog comments powered by Disqus