Can You Understand What I’m Saying?

Clear Communications

In the same vein as our previous post on business communications, "Can You Hear What I'm Saying?," a business communication problem may crop up if clients can't understand what you're trying to say. All the personal and two-way conversations in the world won't help if you are not making yourself clear. A few business-friendly tips to keeping it clear.

1. Define terms. If your clients won't know the acronyms in your business, don't keep throwing them around without explanation. If you're a stock broker, and your new wealthy investor does not know what an ETF is--exchange-traded fund--how will you convince her to let you put her money into them? Your marketing communications and/or documents given to clients need to have the definitions spelled out as if no one has a clue. Yes, even easy ones, like the CDC or FDA. When in doubt, spell it out.

2. Don't recite a list of features. If you're company that has been in business for 5 years, and can provide 20 different services, listing all that as the main reason to choose your business may cause your customer's eyelids to glaze over. How about explaining how your services will ensure that they never have to worry about their heating and air conditioning service again? How about promising that the years of experience guarantees that the service personnel will "arrive on time or the service call is free"? (Yes, I'm dreaming. But wouldn't that be nice!) Make sure your best attributes are there, not for you to look and feel good, but so that your client looks and feels good. See the difference?

3. The shorter, the better. Some of the best marketing I've seen is short and sweet. A quick tag line summing up just what the client is looking for. A handyman service promises that your leaking gutter can be fixed in an hour while you're at work. A tanning salon wants to help us all relax. Find out what your client wants and then keep it short.

Business communications can be daunting to business owners. Calm down, it's not rocket science. You can outsource it to freelance marketing writers/copywriters/corporate writers, depending on what they call themselves. Which one to choose? It's up to you and your needs. If you have marketing collateral to rework or a web site to enlarge, any of the above freelance service providers will work. They will generally have an established web site showcasing their brilliant writing skills and will have impressive references. You'll want to ask for samples and make sure you get some rewrites included in the hefty fee. Shop around and don't settle. Make sure you find the best fit for you.

Or you can do it yourself. If that seems especially scary, remember the more you communicate and the more you try to do it clearly, the better you'll be.

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