Dropping Dollar Puts the Kibosh on European Travel

The dollar is losing value in overseas markets. A main effect of this is increasing expenses for business travelers going overseas. Not only has the average ticket price risen due to the dropping dollar, but add in the growing fuel surcharge tax applied by airlines on top of that and you're in for a double whammy.

The Business Standard says:
"The signs are ominous. The euro is kissing 1.5, the yen is below 108 and a low for the last several years and the pound is persisting above 2. The Fed"s broadest measure of the dollar (the 37-country trade- weighted BROAD index) is close to its historical low of 84, reached in Oct 1978, and July 1995. The news gets bleaker still - oil is at $100 a barrel and commodity producers are planning to change their century-old practice of pricing in dollars."

So, with the dollar at historical lows, overseas travel is an increasingly less attractive proposition for businesses to consider. With this in mind, savvy managers weigh all the options that they have available as they squeeze profit dollars to their bottom lines. Teleconferencing, web conferencing with application sharing, video conferencing, and instant messaging are becoming an accepted alternative to everyday overseas business travel in this growing global marketplace. Although not every business trip can be replaced by teleconferencing, many aspects – such as initial planning meetings, or updates -- can fill in, or even surpass "going there".

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AccuConference | Censorship or Just Doing Business?

Censorship or Just Doing Business?

Book review site GoodReads has caused a stir recently in issuing their new enforcement of comments and reviews on their site. If you read their official statement, it’s clear that these are the policies they have had for a long time, but the announcement of what is tantamount to a crackdown sent cries of censorship into the air.

So the question becomes "is it censorship?"

If I don't like the way a certain business is acting, especially if it is "Corporate Policy", I just take my business elsewhere. With GoodReads, I see it as no different.

What I think GoodReads did wrong was to remove the reviews without warning. GoodReads should have informed the owners of the offending reviews that they would need to be changed or the review would be deleted by a certain date (say, 30 days). On a side note, I don't mind the GoodReads policy of removing reviews that just attack the author.

Show me the content that relates directly to the book. I don't care if the author is a jerk. I want GoodReads to be a place where I find out about books, not author personalities.

Maranda Gibson agrees that it’s the approach that is the problem, not the rules. "You can’t unring a bell and while I support their decision to enforce their rules, a part of managing a community is doing that from the beginning. Goodreads didn’t and now they are getting backlash from trying to clean up a mess they made."

Mary Williams adds, "GoodReads has been around since 2007, so they probably still have things to learn when it comes to community action. The resentment from some of their members about the way they handled removing reviews can be used by the company as a source of what not to do. Giving a fair notice to their members, and allowing their members to correct their reviews, would have been a better way to handle the situation. Hopefully, they will use this experience as a lesson learned and will give their members more notice the next time they make changes to their policy."

Bottom line, this is not a case of censorship. GoodReads, as a business, can create and enforce their policies as they see fit as long as no laws are being broken. It’s the same concept as if someone was walking around a mall with an offensive T-shirt on and asked to either turn the shirt inside-out or leave. It seems this is more of an issue with the way they have handled their policy enforcement. Those who don’t agree with their policy, well they can always go elsewhere.

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