AccuConferenceAccuConference

Apr
26
2010
Express Yourself Maranda Gibson

Ever wondered why saying “goo-goo-ga-ga” in a high pitched voice really seems to get a baby going with the kicks and giggles?

According to Science Daily, new research suggests that infants as young as seven months can be as sensitive to the tone of voice of a parent or loved one as another adult would be. Since infants don’t understand words they relate to the tone of a voice.  It’s easy to forget that the tone of voice you take on a subject is just as important, if not more, than your body movements.

Conveying your emotions on a conference call is not nearly as easy as a game of peek-a-boo, but it can be if you’re aware of your tone. Here are some quick adjustments you can make to your tone so that you can make it a little more clear what you want your audience to understand, beyond saying, “I feel –this way-.”

Soft tones.  Using a soft tone, while it might seem like it would be translated as a soothing sound, in public speaking, it’s one of the worst things you can do. Not only does it bore everyone, but it also doesn’t convey any confidence in the speaker. Instead, use a clear tone while speaking, speak loudly, and don’t be afraid to be excited.

The wrong emphasis on the wrong syllable. You need to use inflection to help your audience understand the topics you’re discussing are very important to you. Just be careful of what you’re emphasizing and why you’re emphasizing that word.  Have a game plan in mind when it comes to what you might be asked and how to express yourself.

It’s not impossible to share your emotions with people when all they have to gauge is with your voice.  Try out these suggestions on your next conference call or tell me what you do to convey your emotions on your conferences.

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