AccuConferenceAccuConference

Feb
03
2009
How To Be An Expert at Research, Part 1 Maranda Gibson

No one I know has a problem collecting information. In this Internet age, the information available to us after a few minutes of searching online is staggering. The key to researching effectively is knowing how to research judiciously. I've got a few tips to help managers or CEOs research well, so that your writing tasks don't take days or weeks (or months!).

1. Always be in gathering mode. This is easy for some who just seem to gather without thinking about it. The problem for natural "gatherers" is organizing and occasional pruning of all this information. Are you one who collects years of magazines and never seems to get around to reading any of them? You have no problem gathering; you just need help focusing. If you pitch junk mail fastidiously and read all your magazines the moment you receive them and then recycle them that evening, well, obviously, you've got everything figured out in your life (just kidding).

2. Diversify your information sources. There are so many options out there! Articles, financial statements, telephone interviews, personal interviews, the Internet, CD-ROMs, intranet databases, microfiche archives, newsgroups, libraries, textbooks, company newsletters, and the list goes on forever. Rather than just read a couple newsletters each month, why not expand your search parameters and look somewhere you've never looked before.

3. Group similar ideas together. Say you're researching a new product and you're gathering information about competitor prototypes, various R&D reports, and feedback from your clients/customers and your marketing department. Say a large part of the research you've gathered shows that your main competitor's product owns the market, but your marketing department believes your product will be superior. Gather that up and find out what your focus group of clients/customers thinks. All those pieces of research that you have supporting your expansion into this market need to be organized together. Invariably you'll have to prepare your findings to highlight why NOT to create such a product.

4. From these groupings, create a generalization about each group. This is when you prepare reports signifying that early findings indicate that moving forward with a prototype project might be a probable next step. Or does your focus group say something else? See what I mean? All this information must be organized or you're left with a pile of papers without any navigational information about how to deal with it all.

5. Compose an "organizational" blueprint for the research you've amassed. This is where mind-mapping or idea charts come into play. Use a white board and get some good company strategists. Is this an idea that you're willing to attempt even though the focus group did not think your product would replace the competition's? Or perhaps the focus group wants the product and your marketing team is struggling with how to position it against the competition. All this is research and information and before you can write it up as internal memos or marketing messages or company goals, you've got to get a handle on what you've got.

In the second half of this post, we'll fine-tune all this research into a thesis for the writing that must happen. It's more of a micro approach to research.

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