How to Crush Creativity

In some companies -- especially large ones – creativity is expected and encouraged only by those paid to be creative.  The rest of the employees are expected to follow policies and procedures, keep quiet, and do what their told.  Of course it's never expressed like that, but the end results are the same.

But where do good ideas come from?  Where is the next gem that will send sales skyrocketing?  A spark of creativity can hit anyone at anytime.  When that does happen, it's best to support both the idea and the person.  Richard Highsmith of BusinessKnowHow writes some tips on how to NOT encourage creativity in the workplace.

First, remember that a man is an island.  Your employees get a paycheck and should be grateful for this.  Any ideas they have were probably inspired by your greatness and are therefore yours.  Plus, you're insulating them from upper management and office politics.

Of course, who are they to suggest anything anyway?  You know best about your company and department.  Only you can see the forest because they are all pruning trees.  Because of this, make sure you tell them your (better) opinions often.  How else will they know what's going on.

By just reading the title of this post I'm sure you realized that I don't really want to encourage the crushing of creativity.  However, I'm sorry to say the above examples aren't made up.  If avoiding these examples are ways to have more creativity in the workplace, what are some proactive things you can do?

Well, realize that other people can have good ideas, no matter their station in life.  If you can't be congratulated for coming up with something creative, at least you can be known as having the foresight, intuition, and humbleness to be able to spot and implement someone else's good idea.

But you can't spot what isn't there, so ask people their opinions about problems.  Have meetings to let anyone throw any idea out there.  Let people know that their thoughts are welcome, appreciated, and most importantly, listened to.

Posted by George Page, Communication Specialist

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