Music is My Inspiration

Getting inspiration can be difficult. No matter what you're doing it always seems like there can be a road block.  For me, one of the hardest things that I do is writing.  Don't get me wrong, I love writing, and I'm pretty much doing it 95% of the time, both at work and at home.  There are times though, when you just get stuck. There's never been anyone in the world that hasn't experienced that. So, how to get through it?

MusicWell, there are things that work differently for each person, but I have found that music is my inspiration. I have my iPod on me at all times. Different kinds of music can spark different kinds of reactions in you as you work, too. For me, if I have an idea that blindsides me and I need to get it out, it's usually something fast. I'll slow it down when it comes time to edit. 

I have a habit of going for the same song over and over again, for a while it was "Hysteria" by Muse, right now, it's All American Rejects. (In case you haven't noticed, I have a wide array of musical choices). I've seen more and more authors giving credit in their published works to the bands that they listened to while they composed their story. Blog writers have started to do this too, by tagging their posts with current music playing information.

I only get my musical suggestions from what's recommended to me, since I rarely listen to the radio, new music escapes me sometimes until someone asks me if I've heard this song. Music can be the thing that opens the doors to communication with a potential client or even a new friend.

Are you sharing your current musical choices with the people around you?

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AccuConference | How to Write Faster

How to Write Faster

Writing Faster

The trick of writing business communications is keeping up with the high demand. There is always a pile of writing to be done on a daily or weekly basis; many managers and CEOs find themselves quickly overwhelmed.

Want to know how others do it? Read on.

1. Writing requires some thinking. You might want to not write anything (not even notes) and just stop for even five minutes and just think deeply on your writing topic. This deep thinking is like firing up the main engine of your brain. Limit distractions and don’t try to check email at the same time. You need to just stare at the wall or at the carpet pattern and think.

2. Now for something completely different. Okay, once you’ve done some thinking, now check the email, make some phone calls, read a trade magazine or newsletter. Better yet, go refill your coffee mug or water bottle. Stretch the legs, look out the window, or step outside for some fresh air. This lets the deep thinking rise to the surface.

3. Open up a new document on your computer or get a fresh page and just let it all out. This is unleashing everything that has been brewing inside your head. And I mean let it all out. No worries about punctuation or organization or even legibility. This is your deep thinking release step. There’s no pressure here, so just let it out.

4. Put it aside and move on to another task. This may be another session of deep thinking or the unending email or meetings or phone calls; this is the detachment phase of the writing. This is where you cut yourself off from the creation aspect of the writing in order to get a more critical eye. This is another no pressure step, so don’t waste it by worrying about what you just wrote.

5. Come back for a first read. Print off a fresh copy and get a pencil. Mark places that you feel are overwritten, circle places you think need more work, connect thought patterns, and generally get a feel for the flow of the piece. This first read should not be stressful and you should not be feeling any panic about the terrible shape your writing is in. That’s normal for everyone, so don’t waste valuable time fretting.

Next, check out Editing Business Communications Quickly and Effectively for a series of easy steps to finalize any piece of business writing.

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