Why Do We Accept Bad Behavior Online?

Spend a little time on the Internet and you'll run into one of two things happening in conversations: either people are being respectful and understanding, or they aren't. We spend so much time using text messages, email, and even message forums where our tone and meaning are lost. We've become a bit desensitized to the way we sound thanks to the Internet and other technological forms of communication, and sometimes we forget what the proper, polite rules are when it comes to speaking to someone directly.

The rules of communication on the Internet do not apply in polite face to face conversation. It's interesting to me some of the things we do online that (most) of us would never consider taking to the offline world. Our level of acceptance to some behaviors is increased or perhaps we just really like having access to that "ban IP" power. I've complied a little list of things that happen online that we would never accept in the offline world.

  • Writing in all caps is basically screaming. Would you walk up to a person and just go toe to toe with them and start screaming in their face? If your answer is anything other than 'no' then you're not emotionally equiped for face to face communication.
  • Pretending to be someone else is never acceptable in face to face communication. This is simply lying. It's one thing to be anonymous online but it's another to embrace a persona or a character and develop relationships along these lines. Eventually, you will have to fess up to the people that are in your community about who and what you really are, or someone will find out.
  • Asking a total stranger for a date (or worse) when you first meet them. Walking up to someone on the street and saying, "Hey, do you want a cup of coffee", will probably get you punched.
  • Call someone a name just because you can.
  • Starting arguments while using the name "anonymous". Imagine someone walking up to you on the street with their face covered in a Richard Nixon mask and trying to get you to talk politics or religion. I'd have a couple of knee jerk reactions, but none of them would be to share my thoughts on the upcoming election.
  • Using a repeat of you're stupid to validate yourself or your argument. Our conversation would not go far if we were face to face, so one has to wonder why we continue to "feed the troll" online.
  • Bring up a completely off topic and horrible offensive subject. Have you ever been standing in a group of friends and have a nice pleasent conversation when someone walks up and says something so horrible that it completely derails the entire vibe of the evening? No? Well, go spend an hour or two on a message board and you'll come across that eventually.
  • Stalk someone. The phrase "stalk" is thrown around on the Internet, but imagine for a moment if you followed your favorite celebrity around offline the way you did online. Twitter is their favorite coffee house, Facebook is their home, and I'm pretty sure at some point, you'd get reported to the police.
  • Threaten someone. Disagreeing with someone in the offline world happens, but it seems like sometimes online those interactions often end with a threat.

So my question is this - Why do we tolerate online what we wouldn't tolerate in face to face communication? Is it easier to turn a blind eye to people being rude, mean, or just downright creepy because we know that we can simply "delete" or "ignore" them online? I also want to know your "okay online but not face to face" rules.

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AccuConference | How to Write Faster

How to Write Faster

Writing Faster

The trick of writing business communications is keeping up with the high demand. There is always a pile of writing to be done on a daily or weekly basis; many managers and CEOs find themselves quickly overwhelmed.

Want to know how others do it? Read on.

1. Writing requires some thinking. You might want to not write anything (not even notes) and just stop for even five minutes and just think deeply on your writing topic. This deep thinking is like firing up the main engine of your brain. Limit distractions and don’t try to check email at the same time. You need to just stare at the wall or at the carpet pattern and think.

2. Now for something completely different. Okay, once you’ve done some thinking, now check the email, make some phone calls, read a trade magazine or newsletter. Better yet, go refill your coffee mug or water bottle. Stretch the legs, look out the window, or step outside for some fresh air. This lets the deep thinking rise to the surface.

3. Open up a new document on your computer or get a fresh page and just let it all out. This is unleashing everything that has been brewing inside your head. And I mean let it all out. No worries about punctuation or organization or even legibility. This is your deep thinking release step. There’s no pressure here, so just let it out.

4. Put it aside and move on to another task. This may be another session of deep thinking or the unending email or meetings or phone calls; this is the detachment phase of the writing. This is where you cut yourself off from the creation aspect of the writing in order to get a more critical eye. This is another no pressure step, so don’t waste it by worrying about what you just wrote.

5. Come back for a first read. Print off a fresh copy and get a pencil. Mark places that you feel are overwritten, circle places you think need more work, connect thought patterns, and generally get a feel for the flow of the piece. This first read should not be stressful and you should not be feeling any panic about the terrible shape your writing is in. That’s normal for everyone, so don’t waste valuable time fretting.

Next, check out Editing Business Communications Quickly and Effectively for a series of easy steps to finalize any piece of business writing.

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