Be An Interesting Speaker, Part 1

Managers and CEOs have to make speeches. It's just a fact of business life. As someone in a position of leadership, you have to get up and talk to your constituents or your employees about policy changes, new business development plans, the state of the break room after lunch time, or whatever. For many, it's old hat; for some, it induces terror of the worst sort. There are many factors to consider when approaching a speaking event, so we'll cover those first.

A few tips to making it through your speaking duties:

1. Consider your body language. Speakers who slump or walk with a wilted appearance won't garner much respect or credibility. Posture is poise. If you stand up straight while you speak, it goes a long way. But you don't have to stand stock still the entire time, you can use planned, natural movements (use of hands and arm gestures, walk in short paces within your speaking space, etc.) that emphasize the points you are trying to make. If you're speaking in a more personal manner, you'll want to lessen the distance between yourself and your audience.

2. Think about your vocal qualities. How your voice sounds is another consideration. If you get really nervous, watch your breathing and slow it as much as possible. Try not to fear silence. If you're in between points and saying nothing, that's better than stuttering um, um, um as you find your bearings. Slow your speech to a meaningful pace (one that isn't so boring as to put people to sleep, but that isn't as fast as you can talk) and take care to enunciate the words you say. Hurrying and not speaking with clarity can seem like you're mumbling instead of speaking.

3. Find out about your speaking environment conditions. What kind of space are you speaking in and to? How will your listeners be seated—around a table, in rows of chairs, around smaller multiple tables? Consider how far away you should be and how close you should be. Communications specialist Mary Munter says that the more objects you place between yourself and the audience, the more formal the interaction. Think about what you should wear? Is it a casual event or should you wear business attire?

In an upcoming post, we'll cover how to practice your speech, relaxation techniques, and last minute jitter techniques.

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AccuConference | Inspire by Overcoming Fear

Inspire by Overcoming Fear

There is a big difference between being “fearful” and being “nervous”. When it comes to public speaking, someone who has stage fright might sweat profusely or revisit their breakfast before it’s time for them to go on stage. I’ve even heard stories about people who stand too straight with their knees locked and just fall over passed out.

Personally, I’m a nervous speaker, probably borderline on the whole “stage fright” bit. It takes me a few minutes to get warmed up in front of a crowd, but once I do, I start feeling some confidence and am able to shake off the nerves. As important as it is to inspire your audience, you have to have some of that inspiration too; otherwise your speech won’t have the same excitement-boosting factor.

Here are some tips on how to draw a little inspiration for yourself before you go out in front of the waiting fans.

  1. You’re out there aren’t you? There are a lot of people who would be too scared of even agreeing to speak at an engagement, let alone being able to take that stage.
  2. Say some good things about yourself. You are your greatest critic after all, so shut up the negative inside of you that wants you to fall off the stage or rip the seam in your pants and pump yourself up with some positive things – even if you only end up complementing yourself on your hair.
  3. The night before your speech do a dramatic reading of your speech. No, maybe your speech isn’t MacBeth or Romeo & Juliet, but doing something really over the top can help you shake off some of those ‘pre-speech’ nerves. Plus – it would be really fun.
  4. Stop second guessing yourself. You’ve been preparing for this speech for weeks, or even months. So put down the notes, stop making changes, and trust yourself. You’re not so bad you know?

What kind of things do you do in your preparation to give yourself an extra boost of confidence? Remember that you have to believe in what you’re saying if you expect a room full of people to believe along with you.

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