Cell Phone Statistics: Updated 2013

 2013 Cell Phone Statistics

New information has been released about how we used our cell phones, smartphones, and mobile devices in 2013. Some of the stats show a clear move among the average cell user towards it being their primary gaming, internet, and communication device. 

New Data From Pew Research

  • 97% of adults have a cell phone. (Up 4% from 2012)
  • Of these, 56% of those phones are considered "smart phones"
  • The cellular phone is the most quickly adopted technology in history. 
  • Cell phones are seen as key to actively participating in your community. 
  • 29% of users describe their phone as something they can't live without. 
  • 9% used their phone to contribute to charity. 
2013 Showed Growth in Mobile Marketing Importance

  • 34% of all users are "mobile only", meaning they use only their mobile devices and have no other computer or telephone. (Up 9% from 2012)
  • 41% of mobile users browse on their mobile devices for a product after seeing it on an ad on television. 
  • 80% of users will participate in e-commerce this year. 
  • 36% of smartphone users admit to "shopping around" on their phones while at a retail location, before committing to a purchase. 
This data is still forthcoming from the final quarter of 2013.  We will post a new update soon. 

2012 Cell Phone Statistics


As technology continues to improve, the use and saturation of cell phones and their users continues to change drastically. The increase over the last ten years has been incredible and the way we use our phones to stay connected and informed continues to change.

From Pew Internet

  • 87% of American adults own a cell phone, and 45% of those are smart phones.
  • Only 12% of adults age 65 and over have a smartphone.
  • 82% take pictures on their cell phones, up from 76% in 2010.
  • 29% check their bank account online, up from 18% in 2011.
  • 9% of adults have texted a charitable organization to make a donation.

CTIA Research Stats

  • 45% of businesses state wireless is essential to operations.
  • 2.27 trillion text messages were sent.
  • 1.1 trillion MB of data was used.
  • 28,641 cell phone towers were added across the US.

Mobile Usage Growth

25% of internet users are mobile only - meaning, they do not access the internet for browsing from any other device.

71% of smartphone users that see TV, press, or advertising that interests them will immediately do a mobile search.

The average American smartphone user spent nearly 30 minutes a day checking or updating social networks.

2011 Cell Phone Statistics
The way we use cell phones has changed drastically over the last year. Once upon a time, we used cell phones to make calls while we were away from our homes. Recent studies show that we may be migrating away from our primary use of the phone to more of a texting and mobile web device.

Pew Studies 2011

  • 53% of adults own a smartphone.
  • 13% of users surveyed pretended to be using their phone in order to avoid social interaction.
  • 42% of people have used their phone for entertainment when they are bored.
  • 51% of users used their cell phone at least once to get information.
  • 27% said they had trouble doing something because they did not have their phone.
  • 29% turn off their phones to take a break from their digital life at night.

Updated Statistics for 2009

I was sitting around the other day marveling about how popular cell phones have become. It’s amazing that in our culture we make ourselves available every minute of every day -- thank goodness for call display! Anyway, I did a quick Google search and stumbled upon an interesting article with a list of cell phone statistics that I thought was worth sharing.  

Here’s what I learned:

  • Cell Phone usage in the US has increased from 34 million to 203 million in the last ten years
  • There is an estimated two billion cell phones world-wide, which means about 4.5 billion people go without.
  • A 2004 MIT survey said that cell phones was ranked as the one invention that people hate the most, but can’t live without. It beat out the alarm clock and the television!
  • A 2005 University of Michigan study said that 83% said cell phones made life easier (choosing it over the internet).
  • A Let’s Talk (retail company) survey said that 38% of people thought it was ok to use a cell phone in the bathroom. (Other stats show cell phone use in restaurants, theaters, supermarkets and subways).
  • A telephia survey said that Americans average 13 talking hours a month – with the 18-24 age group averaging 22 hours.
  • A Sprint survey said that 2/3 people used their cell phone backlight to find something in the dark.

I wonder how many people would stop blogging to answer their cell phone?

Excuse me, I have call…

5 Ways to cut your cell bill - from ConsumerReports Magazine Jan 2008

Special Caller Deals
Cingular has roll-over minutes.  Most carriers allow free in network calls (like a Verizon to Verizon call).  Alltell and T-Mobile offers a select number of phone numbers which you can call for free.

Overage Charges
During months with higher than normal usage, increase your plan just for that month making sure you don't spend the .45 cents per minute for minutes that are over your plan.  Also make sure to regularly check your bills to determine if you need to increase or decrease your lines.  No sense in paying for more than you need.

Control Usage by Children
AT&T offers a limiting service which controls several aspects of the calling behavior.  From the web parents can limit the phone numbers dialed, duration of calls and more.

Pay Attention to All Charges
Getting a good deal on minutes is good, but make sure you consider all other charges.  Text messaging is a great feature but can add up very quickly.  The standard rate for one text message is 15 cents.  With Texting Plans, messaging can drop to only a penny per message.  Also make sure to check the rates for data and web access.

PrePaid Phone
If you barely use any minutes, and 300 minutes is an overkill for you, then a prepaid phone may be the best option.

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AccuConference | Laura Lee Interns at AccuConference: Week 2

Laura Lee Interns at AccuConference: Week 2

 

 

Week two of our blog post series.  This one is written, produced, and directed by our very own Laura Lee. 

Things at Accuconference are good these summer days. I’ve been moving up in the world of telecommunication, having been recently upgraded from the conference room table that I shared with fellow intern Kaitlyn to my own desk, complete with lamp, monitor, and a great third floor view of the parking lot baking in this 100+ degree weather. Things are great. I am learning my way around the building, with the bank being on the main floor and the the deli housed up on the sixth floor. I am pretty much set, and if they would allow me to I would set up camp right under my desk. That would save me the gas money! Rumor has it that the building management here gives out free hot dogs around the fourth of July, and to a cheap college student who’s survived finals week on Ramen and yogurt, this is heaven. I’m learning a lot about what I would like to do for my own career by being in a professional environment day in and day out this summer. I’m realizing that the environment here at Accuconference is dissimilar than anything else I’ve experienced. (You might have guessed that after you read about the free hot dogs). The culture here is different. Of course, the setting is professional, but the atmosphere is implausibly laid back. Whether its people playing practical jokes or ordering lunch together, this place is thriving with goodwill.

I swear to you: I have not made coffee once. (Okay, I made it one time, but it was for Kaitlyn and she’ll be getting the bill later). Instead of grinding beans in the office break room, I’ve been writing up news articles, like the one I wrote about a Fortune 500 company’s recent moves to becoming one of the first that relies solely on alternative, renewable energy. I have even tried my hand at writing a press release. (Epic, epic fail. Hey, practice makes perfect right?) I’ve also contributed to blog postings on the company’s website. Take that, world. It’s good to actually feel of value to people.

This company gets creative with their marketing strategy. Every business should, but when you deal in a market that sells conference call software, it’s either sink or swim when it comes to creativity. Therefore the people here strive to be up to date on the newest marketing ideas, especially on the internet, which has become the platform for everything. Ever counted how many times you hear the phrase “just Google it” in one day? I hear it about 20 times a day. And no, it’s not because I hang out with a bunch of unintelligent people. It’s amazing how quickly the internet changes- just last week the VP of Marketing at Accuconference let break with the news that we needed to change our tactics, because the way we were currently marketing was already outdated. As a Marketing major, I am seeing that in my own career I will be forced to be flexible and be ready to change my tactics at a moment’s notice if I choose to follow a path delving into search engine optimization. To be honest, that thought is a little unsettling. But it’s cool to see this kind of stuff come to life, off the boring print from my school text books.

Was Marketing the right major for me? Am I the type of person who can succeed at this? I have a hunch that I will get a pretty good idea this summer interning. As long as I don’t fry in the heat! And with the right amount of luck, I just might become the next marketing queen of the world. (That would take a lot of luck!)

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