More Talk About Using Teleconferencing To Save Money

The city of San Jose, California has a proposal on the table this week to save their "in the red" city employee travel budget.

Teleconferencing.

"With San Jose confronting chronic budget deficits, one councilman suggests the capital of Silicon Valley could employ computer technology to shrink its more than $1.3 million annual travel costs by substituting virtual travel for the real thing.

Councilman Pierluigi Oliverio has proposed an addition to San Jose's travel policy for city employees that would require them to explore whether Internet teleconferencing could be used to substitute for traveling on the taxpayers' dollar.

'Millions of dollars on travel seems to be high for a city suffering a deficit,' said Oliverio, whose proposal will be considered next Wednesday by an agenda-setting committee chaired by Mayor Chuck Reed. 'Using technology will not only save the city money, it will also help our environment.'

The proposal comes on the heels of a scathing city audit of travel expenses for San Jose's pension trustees and retirement services department that found a loose policy allowed them to routinely overpay for airfare, transportation and lodging. Oliverio noted the retirement travel audit looked just at the spending of one department, whose trip expenses totaled about $90,000 a year and are paid out of pension funds rather than the city's operating budget.

According to travel expense figures provided by the city manager at Oliverio's request, city travel expenditures averaged more than $1.1 million annually over the last eight years."

The Pioneer Press based out of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota reports on the trend for conventional businesses as well.

"Video conferencing has been underwhelming corporate America for years. But maybe it's finally ready for its close-up.

With oil hovering around $100 a barrel and the rigors of business travel looking more and more like an episode of 'Survivor,' more companies are giving the high-tech alternative to the in-person business meeting a second look.

And more are buying in. Video conferencing was a $1.14 billion global market last year, up sharply from about $800 million in 2006, according to Wainhouse Research, a Boston-area technology consultancy that focuses on the industry."

This spike in teleconferencing activity for businesses and city governments shows that once again Americans have figured creative workarounds during the past year. If you haven't considered teleconferencing, why not check it out? You may save some money in the process.

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