Making the Main Event

The hardest part of putting on a big event isn't getting it to start on time, or breaking the ice.  In fact, it isn't even during the event itself.  The hardest part is all the days, weeks, and months before "showtime," when all the planning and preparation occurs.  Here's a few ways that teleconferences can improve your main event by making the before-hand easier.

1.  Planning Sessions – The bigger the event, the more planning it needs.  And sometimes, the big planning meeting can be as complex as the big event.  By using conference calls instead of "getting everyone together," you can fit planning into more people's schedules, and be able to meet more often.  As an added bonus, the conference call recording can be made available for playback in case anyone missed a vital part of the plan.

2.  Juggling Collaboration – Events are a composite of the services of many different groups of people.  For example, the caterer, the band, and the valet company--to name a few--need to be on the same page, especially if there is a central theme.  A good way to convey that theme is to have the key players join your web conference.  You can go over scheduling and such, but you can also share pictures, videos, designs; anything to give them a good idea of the grand motif so that they can play their parts better.

3.  Guest Management – I just received and accepted a party evite.  It told me the directions, time and date, and costume theme; everything I needed to know.  For a much bigger event, there will probably be a need for something more.  If you have guest registration, why not give them a conference call code after they fill in their information.  When they dial-in, they can hear a recording that plays a message from you telling them thanks, what to expect, details of the event, and whatever else you think they'll need.

The key to planning, preparing, and organizing a big event is communication.  It helps keep things smooth and efficient, not to mention getting things finished long before the eleventh hour.  Have you tried using teleconferences to get ready for a big event?  Tell us about it.

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AccuConference | More fun statistics: CEO’s and customer service

More fun statistics: CEO’s and customer service

I was reading an article on redtape.msnbc.com about how CEO's have an inflated sense of their customer support. A recent survey showed that 75% thought that their customer service was “above average.”   Apparently they’ve never had to call it themselves!

A recent study by Accenture and support.com said:

  • 6 in 10 were upset with their most recent customer service experience
  • The average consumer wastes 12 hours every month on computer problems
  • 74% of people rely on family or friend for help, instead of calling customer service tech support
  • 1 in 2 friends and family surveyed said they’d rather help a friend move than offer computer help
  • 81% of consumers who feel they’ve been treated badly say they'll purchase from a competitor next time
  • 27% of people who received “average” treatment say they’ll buy again from the same company

The problem is that companies try to cut costs by shaving their customer service budget down. For example, they will have customers navigate touch-tone voice systems to eliminate the time they spend on person-to-person customer service.

With the cost of acquiring new customers, why not pay a little more to keep them? Great customer service creates loyal customers.  It's just common sense.

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