Take Your Time When Building a Team

The art of team building never ceases to amaze and perplex me. A friend recently went on a team-building exercise over a weekend and came away challenged, yet changed. She and a dozen others hiked into a remote campground with supplies on their backs and underwent extreme physical fitness regimens—twenty pushups for every minute they were late for chow and long hikes uphill—which to me doesn't resemble "camping" in the least. She claims it worked in order to prepare them for their latest venture.

"We learned to trust each other; something that takes time."

And I suppose there's nothing like hours trudging through wilderness to really get to know fellow members of your team. However, her report got me onto the Internet looking again for stories pertaining to team building in business. I found a few items that were interesting and that backed up my friend's claims.

Businessweekly.co.uk writes about building a quality management team in the early stages of your business.

"Speaking to an international audience at the Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning's Ignite programme in Cambridge, the key message from David Boorman, Technology Business Director of Bailey Fisher ~ Executive Search was 'Don't underestimate the time and effort involved in building your team.'"

Lesson number one: be patient and realize the time it takes to build key relationships. My camping friend can vouch for this.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution writes about the team-building process, utilizing outside coaches to marinate a management team, not to whip one up as quickly as possible.

"A strong team makes an impact on everyone around it. Think about the Atlanta Braves' 'worst to first' season in 1991. Having the hometown team in the World Series was electrifying for Atlanta. When the 'miracle,' U.S. ice hockey team took the gold medal in the 1980 Olympics, the entire nation celebrated."

"What would it mean to have a team like that at work? OK, there are no gold medals for IT-system implementation, and even top sales teams rarely get ticker-tape parades, but a high-performing work team is definitely a win in today's business environment. . . ."

"In 2004-05, the Center for Creative Leadership surveyed 118 executives and middle managers to compile 'The State of Teams' report. It found that 95 percent of respondents participated on more than one work team; that 91 percent thought teams were central to the organization's success; and that 80 percent thought leaders needed help building strong teams and keeping teams on track toward exceeding expectations."

"The help often comes from outside coaches, who can bring new insights and skills to the table."

"'Creating a strong team is a process, not a one-time event,' said Martha Carnahan, president of Atlanta-based mc3 strategies and a certified business and life coach. . . ."

I think I hear an echo: Team-building requires large amounts of concentrated time; this is not something you can rush.

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