Taming the Business Paper Tiger

So, a business like this creates paperwork: purchase orders, receipts, pay stubs, shipping invoices, shipping bills. I hate it all. There, I said it and I'm not sorry. Some of the time, filing these papers is habitual. Some receipts go in that file and the remaining receipts go in the other file and the rest are recycled or shredded. I wish I had that kind of organization all the time. If I had my way I'd just shred it all, but my accountant would surely have something to say about that, so I will digress.

As I tackle an office reorganization (every time a product launches, I go into organizational mode), I wanted a few tips on cutting down on paper piles. I found two ideas that really worked for me. See what you think!

Take pictures (or scans) of important documents and/or business receipts on your digital camera and then download the picture into a folder, say August 2008 (all those files get backed up on a nightly basis, right?). Put them on an online backup system or an external hard drive. That's a pretty good idea, actually. You've got the receipt and you can print it if you need it. You can then shred the paper copy. Less paper! The rule of thumb is to keep all business receipts for 7 years and each year, throw out the earliest year. It will be much easier to delete a year's folder from a backup drive than to dig through a storage room to find the 2001 box next year, I say.

If you don't already, you should have an in-house folder (my title for inbox), a read and learn folder, a GTD folder, and a toolkit folder (you can name your folders what you like, I change mine every six months or so to zany names that inspire me).

  1. The in-house folder should be reviewed at least once every 24 hours and items culled from it for immediate action or that go immediately (do not pass go and collect 200 dollars) to the read and learn file or the GTD folder.
  2. The read and learn folder is material to read at a later time. There is so much of this, especially nowadays, so when it gets too full for me, I either throw it out or hand it over to the GTD file. Don't let yourself be buried by required reading that wasn't that important anyway (if it is important, put it in the Toolkit file or the GTD file).
  3. The GTD (from David Allen's Getting Things Done system) folder (actually it's a couple of banker boxes high right now) is material that you need, but want organized. I use alphabetical filing: every folder has a label and is filed alphabetically (the label maker refill companies love me!) This includes receipts, invoices, shipping bills, and so on that can just go away (I love it!). I can find it again if you need it, but it doesn't clutter up my desk.
  4. The toolkit folder should hold the items you need every single day: phone numbers, your rate sheet, your schedule, and a checklist for clients, that sort of thing. I call it a toolkit, because it is. I can't live without it. This includes my paper organizer, a few tip sheets for a couple of clients, and a weekly to-do list that really never changes. Keeps me sane!

My rule of thumb: if it isn't in one of those four categories, it's going to get shredded. August is my filing month (and not a moment too soon) and these guidelines do work. It's fun too, once you get started.

Happy paper taming!

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