The Buck Stops Here

Leadership

Leadership. Even the word strikes fear into the hearts of those stalwart leaders and managers who must lead us every day. If you're a member of the leadership club, we've rounded up a few great news links to help you lessen the fear and actually become a better leader than you thought you could be. Yes, you can!

Furnitureworld.com highlights an important leadership quality that I think is so often overlooked in many of the top leadership how-to books and even in most news articles about leadership.

"You hear it all the time … aspiring managers or vice presidents want to know the most important key to an esteemed business leader's success. Thinking the answer must be something like inspiring leadership, technological innovation, savvy marketing or far-sighted financial planning — all of which are important — their jaws drop when they learn the truth.

Generally, a savvy leader's success is directly tied to his or her ability to focus on the business fundamentals — the daily blocking and tackling that every company must master to be a winner in its field. Strong, effective leaders stress fundamentals like discipline, accountability, strategic alignment, managing to his or her values, and empowering employees. Additionally, these leaders have mastered the six basic functions of management: leading, planning, organizing, staffing, controlling and communicating. But what's the one golden thread tying all those functions together — and the most important key to great leadership? Clear communication."

The Wall Street Journal hits upon a radical approach to leadership: group leadership.

"It's a common corporate approach to a problem: Build a team of experts from different parts of the company and ask them to find a solution.

But these teams could be a lot more effective if companies took one radical step: Share leadership.

This concept, of course, flies in the face of the traditional idea of how companies should operate -- one person is in charge, and the others follow. But in a team of specialists, one expert usually doesn't have the know-how to understand all the facets of the job at hand. Instead, a better approach is to share the top duties, so the person in charge at any moment is the one with the key knowledge, skills and abilities for the aspect of the job at hand. When that changes, a new expert should step to the fore."

These are two really good ideas for leaders seeking a renewal of their skills while in the midst of layoffs and harsh financial times for their company or department.

Take heart, leaders. These are interesting times, but the ability to look outside of proven typical solutions to gain new, bigger results is really quite smart. And just so you know, that's another sign of a good leader. Kudos to you!

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