The Bing and Google Battle

Computerworld released an article last week that alleges that search engine Bing! is more accurate than rival (and unofficial giant) Google. With Experian Hitwise reporting that Bing boasted a higher market share of search, as well as snagging 1% from Google in January, and with a popular marketing campaign that suggests those who use “other” sites suffer from search engine overload, data suggests Bing is making moves in a positive direction.

Even though the allegations are out there that Bing copies Google’s algorithms, the response by Microsoft that denies the allegations, and a number of other denials and finger pointing – the truth, as they say, is in the search – or is that pudding?

There is a lot of wiggle room in these numbers though and it is slightly irresponsible to see higher percentages and simply state that Bing is hanging it to Google in the accurate search department. Among many other things that stand out and being possibly fallacies, I see three big problems with just looking at the numbers of Bing .VS. Google.

  1. The numbers don’t address the browser that is being used. If you open Internet Explorer, the default search engine is going to be Bing! and for someone who doesn’t use search that often, it’s easiest to just go with what is given.
  2. There is no accounting for who is searching – the difference between someone who is “experienced” at web surfing and someone who will go to whatever engine is provided and click on the first link that comes up.
  3. How many of the Bing! users have to go back and search again? Are the percentages reported from Experian Hitwise taking into account that those users might have to come back and search again because they didn’t get what they want?

Google has long carried the mission statement that they are dedicated to providing the most accurate search results in in your first query. Look at this study from last year that shows that most Google users are experts, while most Bing! users aren’t. Doesn’t that speak to the quality of results that a Google user will generate versus a Bing! user? Saying that a higher number of clicks means the results are more accurate is kind of like saying I have more money in the bank, so I make more than you, to someone like Donald Trump.

What do you think? Is Google losing ground – or is the whole thing just a bunch of baloney without any real meat?

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AccuConference | The Leader of a Brainstorm

The Leader of a Brainstorm

A good brainstorming session has ideas flying all over the place.  Sometimes it's tough to keep up while writing gems down.  Everyone is contributing, jumping in as soon as someone else finishes, and talking as fast as possible.  Unfortunately, most sessions aren't like this.

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and a brainstorm session is only as good as its leader.  To help us make sure we're good leaders, the Heart of Innovation blog over at IdeaChampions lists ten traits of a good brainstorm leader.  Here are my four favorites:

Number one on their list is to be a brainstorm leader, you must be a conductor.  A lot of times there are multiple personalities and multiple disciplines in the room and you have to be able to manage the ebb and flow between them.  Not to mention keeping the whole idea-train on track.

A big part of a good brainstorm is wading through the okay ideas to get to the gems.  And even then, a leader needs to be a good gem cutter.  Even the best ideas don't emerge fully polished and ready to go.  No, they must be cut and shaped to fit exactly what is needed and what the goals are.

With all the chaos of a brainstorm, there still must be order.  It's your job as officer of the law – or as I call it: sergeant-at-arms - to keep the peace.  This could be as easy as being a traffic cop for whose turn it is to speak, or even stepping in to halt an argument of opposing ideas.

Number four is important - even if it's last on the Idea Champions list.  You have to be a stand-up comic of sorts when leading a brainstorm.  When people share their ideas, even ones they just came up with, they invest parts of themselves.  Egos can be bruised, feelings hurt, and tempers flared.  But that's where humor comes in.  You can defuse tense situations and keep things light - and moving - with a little humor here and there.

Those are my four favorites of Idea Champion's list of ten.  Head over there and check out their list then come back here and leave a comment with your favorites and any other roles you know of necessary to lead a good brainstorming session.

Posted by George Page, Communication Specialist

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