Using Intuition To Make Business Decisions

Many of the best managers we've met (or have heard about) not only have education and experience, they also boast intuitive decision making skills. These intuitive skills are based on an ability to recognize patterns at lightning speed. Gleaned from years of experience, the right decision comes in a flash, as quickly and effortlessly as "a recognition of information that has been largely forgotten by the conscious mind," writes Richard Daft in the upcoming new edition of Management (due out in 2009), one of his many textbooks on the subject of business management. He reports that "in the business world, managers continuously perceive and process information that they may not consciously be aware of, and their base of knowledge and experience helps them make decision that may be characterized by uncertainty and ambiguity."

Another book, recently published, called The Feminine Side of Leadership, by business executive Jenny Fisher "shares her experience and insight on how to maximize the creativity and talents of team members by creating a trusting and supportive work environment."

"‘The Feminine Side of Leadership is an invaluable tool to help people recognize their current management strengths and identify growth areas to improve their personal leadership effectiveness,' says Fisher. ‘Readers will learn how to use their leadership skills to inspire creativity and foster growth throughout their organization. By utilizing our inner strength and unleashing the power within us we can create a passionate, high-performance work environment that inspires others to succeed.'"

Using intuition rather than rational analysis to make business decisions is a timeworn tradition, not a newfangled invention or an exact science, even though recent books may promise that.

Gary Klein's Intuition at Work: Why Developing Your Gut Instincts Will Make You Better at What You Do (2002) was the penultimate book written to harness and channel this timeworn tradition. The book has been called the definitive work on intuition in business management, featured in the Wall Street Journal, and revered by business managers.

Klein writes, "Some experts encourage us to follow our intuitions, while others counsel us to suppress our intuitions because they are inherently biased. At first glance, we seem to be caught in a dilemma. Fortunately, research conducted during the past fifteen years points to a path forward."

"In order to take that path, we have to reject the dilemma. We shouldn't simply follow our intuitions, as they can be unreliable and need to be monitored. Yet we shouldn't suppress our intuitions either, because they are essential to our decision making and can't be replaced by analyses or procedures. Thus our only real option is to strengthen our intuitions so that they become more accurate and provide us with better insights."

If you wish to strengthen your intuition as a business manager, which has returned to the forefront as a skill to be mastered, perhaps checking out Klein and Fisher and Daft will help you in your quest.

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