Writing Better Will Help You Keep Your Job

It's really true. Your ability to communicate shows up in more ways than just getting what you ordered at a restaurant the first time. It could save your career. I now sound like Penelope Trunk and a post from her blog about how to write to improve your job performance.

Trunk states that "Almost one-third of workers do not meet the writing requirements of their positions, according to a survey by the College Board's National Commission on Writing."

Trunk's post is from 2004 (yeah, I know, a golden oldie) but I think it fits the point. Do you really know how to write and could you do it if your career (not just your job) depended on it?

Some of Trunk's pointers (I'm including the every item on her list, because they are just so good):

1. Write lists.
People love reading lists. . . . If you can't list your ideas then you aren't organized enough to send them to someone else.

2. Think on your own time.
Most of us think while we write. . . . Find your main point in each paragraph and delete everything else.

3. Keep paragraphs short.
Your idea gets lost in a paragraph that's more than four or five lines. Two lines is the best length if you really need your reader to digest each word.

4. Write like you talk.
Each of us has the gift of rhythm when it comes to sentences, which includes a natural economy of language. But you must practice writing in order to transfer your verbal gifts to the page. . . .

5. Delete.
When you're finished, you're not finished: cut 10% of the words. . . . Luckily, you don't have to write for publication, so you can celebrate if you cut more than 10%. . . .

6. Avoid adjectives and adverbs.
The fastest way to a point is to let the facts speak for themselves. Adjectives and adverbs are your interpretation of the facts. If you present the right facts, you won't need to throw in your interpretation. . . .

I don't have anything to add to this list, which is not surprising. It's a good list! One way to learn to write like you talk is to get a tape recorder (I've done this recently). Yes, your coworkers will think you've lost it, but it works! Talk away into the mic, and let it all out, jumbled and raw and just how you thought it originally. You can then upload the audio to your computer and transcribe into a Word document. I wouldn't recommend this for every single email to your boss, but for a large report when you just need to get something on the page, why not? It beats the blank page blues and as usual, I realize I have a lot more to say than I can ever use in my written report.

 

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