Writing Effective Emails

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Since many things are done via email now, thanks to smartphones and iPads, we’re never too far away from our emails, and more of us are choosing to communicate via that method.

When it comes to writing an effective email, it’s all about being aware of what you’re doing and what you could potentially be saying. Here’s a quick list of Do’s and Don’ts for writing emails, whether you are communicating with a customer or another business associate.

Do use language appropriate for the person you’re speaking to. If the person you’re emailing doesn’t work in IT, don’t use technical jargon to respond to their emails. Speak on a level that is appropriate for who you’re emailing.

Don’t be afraid to sound like you know what you’re talking about. If you’re asked a specific question, answer it to the best of your abilities, but keep the language you use appropriate for who you are speaking to.

Do keep in mind that things get lost in translation. If you’ve ever had a conversation with a friend then you know that there is sometimes a question on what the person on the other end meant, keep that in mind when sending an email. Sarcasm and humor can get lost quickly in an email.

Don’t forget to read the email out loud before you send. Not only will this help you to proofread any grammar or spelling errors you can hear how your brain is inferring the speech in the email so that you can take out anything that might not translate.

Do answer all the questions presented to you in an email.

Don’t write a novel when a sentence would do.

Do use a canned email when appropriate. Sometimes, it’s okay to have emails on “stand by” to send back. A perfect example of this would be if you’re sending someone steps to walk them through how to do something. It’s okay to have that email ready to send so that you don’t have to type out all of the steps over and over again.

Don’t get so caught up in a canned response that you miss what the person is asking. Read the email thoroughly and used a canned email only when appropriate. You still need to be sure you’re answering inquires posed to you.

Do ask for greater clarification in order to understand what the person needs. It’s perfectly okay to make sure that someone means X rather than Y and most would rather clarify then have you misunderstand and respond anyway.

Don’t feel like an email conversation cannot become a phone conversation. For me, the rule is more than three emails back and forth and it’s time to pick up the phone and make the call.

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