Timing is Everything for Web Conferences

Sometimes in the flurry to plan an event, such as a web conference, many details are left unattended. This can happen to any organization, whether it is their very first web conference or they hold such an event every week.

Take some time to think about all that is involved, make lists, and divide up tasks. Do what you have to so that you can be assured that things will run smoothly.

You have no control over attendees' schedules, but you can make sure that the timing is coordinated. If you have participants in different parts of the U.S. or different parts of the world, you need to be certain that everything is set for the right people at the right time.

It is quite possible to get into a tizzy about speakers, technology, topics and other matters, forgetting that time is of the essence.

Also, be certain to inform participants not only of the time, but also of the duration of the web conference. It is so easy to concentrate on getting the start time correct, that you omit to advise people of how long they are expected to attend. You want key people to be able to take part in the entire web conference, so give them advance notice to clear time on their schedules.

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AccuConference | Your Best Presentation Tool is Your Voice

Your Best Presentation Tool is Your Voice

Think of any lecture, presentation, video conference, web conference, speech, or conference call you've ever attended.  What do they all have in common?  Someone is speaking.  We humans have many ways of communicating, but our voices are the main choice.  Since it's so important, how can you improve your voice to help your business?

Bill Lampton of BusinessKnowHow has a list of twelve tips to make the most of your voice.  All of them are helpful, but let's look at three in particular.  First, pauses get both pros and cons in Lampton's article, and for good reason.  Be careful not to pause too often or in peculiar spots.  A good place to pause would be at the end of a paragraph and not after each sentence – or in the middle of sentences.  These "complete thought" pauses give the audience a chance to take in all you have said.

Of course, the pauses also help to give audible cues to significant parts of your speeches.  You can alter your rate of speaking to indicate you are leading to a point. Then after you have made the point, a nice pause solidifies it. You don't want to speak too rapidly so as to lose your audience, but keep in mind that too slow will bore them.  Too fast or too slow will be a distraction from your message.

Finally, remember that no two voices are the same.  This means that as more people recognize your voice, the more unique and special it will be.   If people begin to associate your voice with good solid information or leadership, they will look forward to your speeches.  And as you notice more people eager to hear your voice, you'll start looking forward to your speeches too.

Posted by George Page, Communication Specialist

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