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Dec
28
2010
Using *6 on Your Conference Call Maranda Gibson

We are a community of multitaskers, like the supermen and women of technology, able to do one thousand things at once. Okay, maybe not a thousand, but we are usually involved in two things at once. Whether we are cooking dinner and kicking a cat out of the kitchen or answering the phone and email at the same time, we like to fill our time with two things at once.

When it comes to being on a conference call, it may seem like the perfect time to call in on your cell phone and head over to the local market to get a tube of toothpaste (that counts as still working right?). What you might forget about while checking out is that everyone (including a boss or a potential client) can hear the beeping as things slide across the scanner and the muffled cursing as you try to hold your phone, pick up your bags, and get your change from the cashier. (Three things at once have a tendency to throw us off balance).

This is the perfect time to mute your own line using the *6 command. *6 is a command that can be used in a lot of different ways. Here are just a few ways to use the *6 command on your next conference call.

  • If you’re hosting a conference with multiple moderators and speakers, remember that your line is always open to the attendees. If you’re waiting for your chance to speak or simply listening in, press *6 on your telephone keypad to mute your line. You can use *6 again when it’s your turn to speak to open your line back up.
  • On conferences with a small number of attendees, you can use the *6 command to go through Q&A sessions. Each participant can keep their line muted until they have a question or a comment on the conference. As the moderator, you can see on the live call screen when someone unmutes their line and know that they intend to speak.
  • During a moderated Q&A session, once your line is unmuted, it will stay open until the operator goes to the next question in line. When you’re just listening to the answer to your question, press *6 to mute your line so that the moderator won’t be interrupted.

*6 is just one of the conference call star commands we have available, and you can check out the list of all our star commands. But remember, even with these tips, you should never assume that mute is on, and always be aware of your surroundings when on a conference call.

Dec
09
2010
Inspire by Overcoming Fear Maranda Gibson

There is a big difference between being “fearful” and being “nervous”. When it comes to public speaking, someone who has stage fright might sweat profusely or revisit their breakfast before it’s time for them to go on stage. I’ve even heard stories about people who stand too straight with their knees locked and just fall over passed out.

Personally, I’m a nervous speaker, probably borderline on the whole “stage fright” bit. It takes me a few minutes to get warmed up in front of a crowd, but once I do, I start feeling some confidence and am able to shake off the nerves. As important as it is to inspire your audience, you have to have some of that inspiration too; otherwise your speech won’t have the same excitement-boosting factor.

Here are some tips on how to draw a little inspiration for yourself before you go out in front of the waiting fans.

  1. You’re out there aren’t you? There are a lot of people who would be too scared of even agreeing to speak at an engagement, let alone being able to take that stage.
  2. Say some good things about yourself. You are your greatest critic after all, so shut up the negative inside of you that wants you to fall off the stage or rip the seam in your pants and pump yourself up with some positive things – even if you only end up complementing yourself on your hair.
  3. The night before your speech do a dramatic reading of your speech. No, maybe your speech isn’t MacBeth or Romeo & Juliet, but doing something really over the top can help you shake off some of those ‘pre-speech’ nerves. Plus – it would be really fun.
  4. Stop second guessing yourself. You’ve been preparing for this speech for weeks, or even months. So put down the notes, stop making changes, and trust yourself. You’re not so bad you know?

What kind of things do you do in your preparation to give yourself an extra boost of confidence? Remember that you have to believe in what you’re saying if you expect a room full of people to believe along with you.

Dec
08
2010
Preventing Virtual Failure George Page

Teams, teamwork, and effective communication have been foundations for success in business, and it’s no different in this new digital age. Virtual teams have the same challenges as those working together in the same space, however, there are certain aspects we should emphasize more in virtual teams to ensure we reach our goals.

There are three things that need extra care in virtual teams: leadership, clear goals, and engagement.

Strong leadership is more important when a team is spread around the globe than when everyone is in the same office. Leadership tools such as setting an example, walking the halls, and mere presence are absent from a virtual team atmosphere. Instead, a leader needs to have solid interpersonal skills, communicate effectively, keep conference calls and other team events on task, and seize every chance for motivation. Other tools a leader can use is honest, detailed feedback, and team-building exercises.

Not just goals, but clear and obtainable goals are a must for a virtual team to be successful. If team members are only expected to “see what happens”, enthusiasm and motivation go out the window. We need to have obtainable goals for the team and--perhaps more importantly--individual team members. This gives them something to work for, with built in accountability to the leader and the the rest of the team, as well as a morale boost whenever a goal is checked of the list.

Engaging team members is more than just making sure if they’re working or not. It’s keeping them motivated, interested, and on task. The basics are including them in the plan, changes in the plan, and sharing feedback on their work and the team as a whole. In every team conference call, it’s a good idea to bring everyone into the conversation, even if it’s just small talk before the actual meeting. We can also do team-building games, hear stories about where each person is working from, or simply let each person make the “big announcement” regarding their own progress.

How is your virtual team doing? Tell us about its leadership, goals, and how you keep them engaged.

Dec
06
2010
Get Connected to Your Staff, Students, and Speakers. Maranda Gibson

Tis the season for … snow, ice, and roads that you can’t even look at without spinning wildly out of control. In most parts of the country there is one constant in every winter season – winter weather, and it causes a headache. Seattle, WA and Buffalo, NY have already experienced a snow storm, one that snarls traffic, and makes getting to work nearly impossible.

Earlier this week, there were reports that we were going to get some “record-breaking snowfall” here in DFW. That report has since started to fade from the forecast, but if the early season computer models are already starting to predict snowfalls, I can only imagine what will happen come January.

Not only is this the beginning of the winter weather season but it’s also the holidays – a time of year when non-profit organizations are hosting fundraisers. What happens when an event you planned has to be cancelled or if your guests cannot safely arrive? As an educator, how do you prepare when a crucial lecture must be rescheduled? In government, you can’t run a country without being able to get people in the same place – so how do you continue when you can’t get to work, school, or your event?

Check with your conference call provider to see what their capacity is for last minute / large events. Get everyone on your conference call and let business continue as usual. Even if you’re in sunny California with a speaker who’s stranded in their hometown, you can get a phone hooked up to the loudspeakers and have your speaker call in. Their presentation still happens and your guests are still happy. Your event happens, despite Mother Nature’s disagreement with you.

Where was the worst place you were stranded during snow or ice? How did you continue conducting your business or did you crawl under a blanket and come out after everything thawed out?

Nov
09
2010
Remember: Conference Call Mute Is Never On Maranda Gibson

It is an inevitable thing that is going to happen on conference call. Someone is going to forget to mute their phone. There are a million stories out there of how people have heard bathroom visits, ordering fast food, or worse. These interruptions are embarrassing, not only for the person responsible, but also for the host of the conference call.

Most conference hosts are diligent about putting the call into lecture mode and participants usually try to mute their conference lines. This doesn’t always happen.

Once, as an operator on a conference, I had the pleasure of dealing with a client who was going to have some high profile people on their conference. The client expressed to me that it was important that there were no back ground interruptions on the call. I explained that all the participants would be muted, but since there would be about seven people on with the special speaker code, those lines wouldn’t be muted. I suggested they use our star feature to mute the call and even had everyone test out the function to make sure the feature worked.

Inevitably, when the call started and one of the high profile guests was speaking, my client’s line was not muted and I suddenly heard the announcement that train #356 to Boston would be departing in five minutes. Having been on a number of operator conferences, I made the decision to mute his line, in order to avoid that playing over these high profile guests. It made me uneasy to have to do that – but I couldn’t risk his conference being interrupted, and this is the exact reason why people elect to have operators on their conference.

Audio conferences can be tricky. They aren’t necessarily hard to participate in but there are a lot of things to remember, and sometimes – it’s the simplest things that we can forget about.

It brings up a great point about being on a conference – always assume your line is not muted, even when it is. Even when you are certain you’ve muted your phone, or you just got the message that your line was muted, you never know when something could happen to unmute. What if your moderator accidentally turns off the feature or you’re disciplining one of your kids, across the room from your phone, and the moderator suddenly opens the lines up for questions.

In an instant the entire conference hears you explaining to your children why chocolate frosting is not an appropriate substitute for paint.

Always assume that your line is live – and it’s a good rule that can apply to audio conferences or video. Assuming that you’re on video will save you from possible embarrassment.

How are you managing on your conference calls? Are you assuming that mute is on, or are you doing things the same way that you would with a conference that was live?

Tell me your embarrassing moment in the comments – and if yours is the one that inspires the deepest shade of red, you’ll win a prize. (Details to come) I look forward to hearing your stories!

Nov
08
2010
Using the ICEPACk George Page

Until today, I had never heard of ICEPAC, but this acronym stands for the steps of creating a great presentation. Whether you have weeks to craft, or get handed the project last minute, this acronym--and the other tips in the article--break down a presentation into easy-made parts.

ICEPAC

Interest - If no one cares about a subject, then why bother with a web conference? If they’re supposed to care, then it’s your job to make them care. Think about how your message will affect your participants daily lives and business, and emphasize the more interesting points.

Comprehension - There’s such a thing as too much detail, especially if your participants will get information overload. Keep data to bite sized chunks, avoid jargon, and cater to their--not your--expertise.

Emphasis - The main message is the whole point of your presentation, so emphasize it. Put key information on its own slide. Pause after saying a main point, or even precede it with, “This is important.”

Participation - Getting your participants involved creates more investment on their part. Utilize Q&A often, or ask impromptu, “soft ball” questions. Use the Socratic Method to draw people out, and praise highly when it works.

Accomplishment - For people to be more open to ideas, they have to like the ideas. And the best way of getting them to like ideas is for them to be a part of their creation. With good participation, you’re halfway there, but the web conference as a whole should be satisfying with something completed, decided on, or improved.

Confirmation - This is more than follow-up after the conference, it includes during as well. Q&A throughout is good to make sure you’re on track. And it never hurts to get participants to repeat their assignments so you know they understand.

Try ICEPAC when you create your next presentation and let us know how it worked for you.

Nov
03
2010
How to Debate Effectively and Rationally Maranda Gibson

Host your next debate via conference call by setting up an account with AccuConference.  Universities receive a 50% discount. 

Today is November 3, 2010, which means that the elections were held yesterday. Now, whether it was a good day or a bad day for you and your political ideals, the results are going to stick around for 2 years. “They” say you’re not supposed to talk about politics; it leaves open too much room for drama and disagreement. In watching the election coverage last night, I saw that a lot of the members of the panels on various news organizations couldn’t have a meaningful debate.

They were rude, inappropriate, and just downright mean to their fellow panelists. I’m a huge supporter of a healthy debate, civility in discussion, and above all, being passionate about what is being discussed. Ultimately, if you’re going to have a discussion, you should be passionate about it, otherwise, what are you talking about? We’re advised not to discuss politics and it’s because of this passion that these kinds of discussion can be dangerous firecrackers waiting to explode.

We proceed carefully on a conference call when discussing something that is controversial or will change the face of our company, like hiring and firing. We shy away from open discussion and the sharing of ideas. Why is that? We are adults and we should be able to have conversations.

The principals of debate are clear but somewhere along the lines we’ve forgotten what it was like to have a civil conversation with others about topics we might disagree with. Here are ten tips to consider before engaging in healthy debate.

  1. Be prepared. Don’t be surprised when the passion from both sides bleeds through.
  2. Let the other person finish. Interrupting the other person makes you look like a jerk.
  3. Be open to accepting another person’s point of view. In order to engage in debate, you must be willing to understand where someone is coming from, even if you disagree.
  4. Consider your response carefully. Think about what you are about to say before you just fire off at the mouth. You can’t take it back once you say it, so don’t say anything you’ll regret.
  5. Have Respect. Have respect for the other person’s opinion, but don’t concede your own.
  6. Listen intently. Healthy debate is not just about making you heard; it’s about hearing someone else.
  7. Try to see things from the other side. Before you respond, consider what the other person has said and what their motivations might be. You don’t have to agree, but everyone is capable of understanding the other perspective.
  8. It should be called conversation, not debate. It should be about discussing opposing points of view and learning from each other.
  9. Answer follow up questions. If the person you’re speaking with asks you a direct question, answer it. They are engaged in the conversation and want to know more about your feelings.
  10. Be passionate, but be polite. Name calling and generalizations only encourage people feel attacked. You can have passion about your point of view, but you should never revert to name calling. You’re not eight and this is not the playground.

Bonus Tip: Shake hands.At the end of every debate, shake hands and take a moment to converse about something that’s not debate related. These conversations usually come up with our inner circles, so once it’s all over, talk about something you both agree on.

Look, debating with a person who opposes your views and an opinion is hard, but when you’re a grown up, I like to think it’s possible to sit down and talk about things with others, no matter what their opinions. Some of the greatest ideas in the world have been born from healthy debate and there’s no reason why we should just not talk about something because we disagree.

Nov
02
2010
Storm Spotters Use Video Conferences on Mobile Devices Maranda Gibson

Storm Spotters Use Video Conferencing On Mobile Devices

Ever since I was a little girl, I have been fascinated by the weather. When severe weather strikes, you can find me online tracking the storms and watching the coverage across the United States. I love to watch storms as they pop, fire, and start to hook around, causing that intimidating tornado warning. As long as the warning sirens around me aren’t sounding, I am all over the coverage and the radars. Recent outbreaks of the severe weather have shown me something very interesting.

Storm chasers are using their mobile devices to broadcast their chase to the local weather stations. If you like watching the weather you’ve probably stopped over at severestudios.com or chasertv.com. These are chasers who have live streaming video from their cars of the storms they are chasing. Not all storm spotters are equipped with these kinds of devices and for a meteorologist, who is broadcasting live in studio, the storm spotter is essential to knowing where the worst of the weather is located.

With mobile video conferencing becoming more widely available on devices, chasers without a partnership with a streaming website can call their local weatherman and show them what they see, as well as telling them where they are. One of the hardest things about storms is that they are unpredictable and while the National Weather Service and local meteorologists do the best they can, it’s an imperfect system. Having chasers in the field gives you an ability that wasn’t there for prediction ten years ago: Knowing exactly where a tornado is on the ground.

Radar signatures are very helpful but there is no sure fire way to say that a storm will put a tornado down at a specific location. Unfortunately, confirmation of tornados to broadcasters only comes in the form of damage reports from emergency management, and for those reporting the damage, the information is simply too late. Imagine the ability to have spotters everywhere with mobile devices, streaming as they watch the clouds roll through. Meteorologists could then see as funnel clouds form, drop to the ground, and kick up debris.

Imagine the warning you could give if you could say there was a tornado on the ground on a particular street or intersection. As someone who lives in an area that is prone to tornado touchdowns, I have to say that the use of this technology could give greater piece of mind to the public, as well as giving meteorologists a better idea of how tornados form, and what makes for great conditions for tornados.

How do you think video conferencing on mobile devices will change the way storms are predicted?

Oct
28
2010
The Monsters Guide to Public Speaking Maranda Gibson

The Monsters Guide to Public Speaking

Halloween is this weekend and with it comes scary stories, fright nights, and a lot of things you don’t see every day. It’s the one time of the year that ghosts and goblins can come out of their hiding places. Since they only make one public appearance a year, they like to make it count and offer some valuable insights into the realm of public speaking – what works and what doesn’t.

Zombie

Eating brains does not translate into a warm and friendly greeting to your guests.

Instead, arrive at your event about an hour early and shake hands instead of eating brains—oops, I mean breakfast. Introduce yourself and find out more about what brought people to see you speak and what they would like to know more about.

Ghost

Be transparent and friendly.

Standing up in front of a group of people can be intimidating. It will help you as the speaker to relax along with your participants if you are humorous, friendly, and open with your audience.

Witch

Don’t be afraid to dazzle with a little magic.

Unless you are presenting in Salem, MA, somewhere between 1692 and 1693, your audience would probably like a little flash and dazzle. Since you only have about two minutes to grab their attention and keep them interested for the whole presentation, don’t be afraid to open the presentation with a splash.

Frankenstein

Don’t walk like a robot.

Frankenstein makes an excellent point about the importance of being able to move fluidly around the stage. When you move, you’re forcing audience members to pay attention and notice you. Otherwise, you’re just going to be a droning and unmoving piece of furniture on the stage. The more comfortable you are with being in front of a group, the better.

Vampire

Give them something to sink their teeth into.

In the end, if you’re not talking about something that matters, you’re not going to get a great response. Be sure that the content of your presentation or topic is relevant and intriguing, and offer clear ways for your participants to be involved during and after the presentation.

Hope you enjoyed that insight from the people who know what it’s like to make one public appearance a year. You have to come out swinging; otherwise, you’ll end up six feet under.

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

Oct
26
2010
Conference Call Rewards Maranda Gibson

At the store where I buy groceries they have one of those card programs where you get money off the specific items you buy. These cards have always had great deals on groceries and this weekend, I learned that I can use my card at the gas station to get a discount. I didn’t have to do anything special besides shop at this particular grocery chain. Just by being a member, I get a gas discount.

A lot of our customers call us and ask us how they can customize their services and, much like I was with the money off on a gallon of gas, are surprised to find that we have many included services. Here are five things we get asked about that are already a part of your conference service.

  1. AccuConference has the ability to record all of your audio, video, and web conferences.
  2. Pre-record an audio message that can be played to participants on a live conference call. You can control the recording playback from the live call screen, and pause the recording to take questions or add additional information.
  3. Your recorded web and video conference session can be provided within the day. While we have the ability to send you a CD, for when you need something right away, we can also send you a download link that will allow accessing the completed file much faster than waiting on the delivery.
  4. Our services can be customized to fit your individual needs for your conference. If you have special requests please give us a call and one of our operators will be happy to help explain our options.

Remember our services include a lot of things that you may never know about until you need them. Finding out that your conference services have a lot of options included is a wonderful surprise, with no loyalty card needed.

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