AccuConferenceAccuConference

Oct
31
2006
Entry/Exit Tones and DTMF Accuconference

The final piece of a good conference call depends on the conferencing service that the business is using. AccuConference provides a significant number of features that allows customers to customize what messages are played into the conference. This will enable the call to be tailored to the customer’s needs.

On every call AccuConference hosts, a feature known as “DTMF clamping” is employed. This feature essentially traps the touch tones on the phone so that they are not played into the conference. Many other conferencing providers cannot provide this feature, and, as a result, cause a conference call to be of a lower quality. Because DTMF tones are used to activate features (such as the *6 to mute an AccuConference line), many systems simply pass the DTMF tone into the conference, which means that when the moderator goes to mute the phone line with a *6 command, the * and the 6 tones are echoed into the entire conference. DTMF clamping solves this issue. AccuConference bridges trap these tones _before_ they are played into the conference call and simply does not echo them into the call. The result is that when a *6 is pressed to mute a line, the tones are not played into the call, and the conference is not interrupted.

AccuConference also provides, by default, entry and exit tones into a call. These tones signal the arrival of a ne w party to the call, or can notify the conference when someone drops off. In addition, AccuConference also allows customers to turn on “name recording” to be played into a conference. The result is that an announcement of the person joining the call is played into the call as well as the entry tone. As an additional feature, the AccuConference website allows customers to choose whether or not entry/exit tones and/or name recording are turned on at all. By disabling both, the call will not be interrupted when people join or drop off. A customer can continue to monitor the call via the AccuConference website to determine when someone joins or disconnects.

 

Oct
28
2006
Phone Accuconference

The first and most important component of a good telephone call is always the phone itself. Businesses generally have a PBX system or some higher quality telephones, and the richness of the audio in the conference reflects this. Purchase an inexpensive phone, and the call will reflect it.

Recently, headsets have become very popular in the business world. In prior years, only customer service and call-center agents made use of them. The last few years have seen a rise in the number of businesses that have begun outfitting their employees with headsets. We recommend any headset from Plantronics (http://www.plantronics.com). These headsets are generally more expensive, but with features such as noise cancellation and secure communications, they provide superior quality as well as comfort for the wearer. Their top of the line models even work wirelessly with any desk phone. Beware of lower priced and lower quality headsets. They can damage a conference call faster than any other factor.

Speakerphones are generally considered poor for hosting conference calls. Some of the top of the line speakerphones, such as the ones from Polycom (http://www.polycom.com) are better than most, but because of the sensitivity of the speaker and the close proximity of the microphone, they have a tendency to introduce extra noise and sometimes echo into the conference. If the phone is on a conference table, then if someone bumps the table accidentally with their knee, the sound vibrates the entire table, and by default, the speakerphone itself. The entire conference must suffer through these little clicks and bumps. This is why speakerphone use is generally discouraged for a conference.

 

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