Creating Effective PowerPoint Slides

After last looking at the macro approach to presentations, which involved figuring out which pieces go where and in what order and creating a cohesive whole, in this post we'll discuss building the individual slide itself -- how to title, how to use graphics, etc.

1. Each slide needs a title. A lot of presentation specialists may argue the point, but how confusing is it to come into the middle of a presentation having missed the first five minutes and there's a slide up without any telling information on it. It's a graph, with lots of numbers, but the late arriving attendee has no idea what the information represents and has to dig through his handout or ask someone for information. Why not just put a headline on it? It's an easy, straightforward, audience-friendly approach.

2. Titles are not all considered equal. Communications specialist Mary Munter terms good titles as "message titles" and bad titles as "topic titles." Basically, a topic title is something like "Our Company" while a message title is "Our Company's Growth in 2008." So many presentation templates emphasize the use of topic titles (for those presenters just quickly throwing together their slides at the last minute), but take a few more minutes and think it through. How best can you explain what's on that slide? What message do you want to send about that slide?

3. Using graphs, word charts, and concept diagrams. Slide after slide of text may not be the best approach. If you have information that can be presented another way, why not try it? In most presentation programs, there are a variety of chart options to insert into your presentation. If you are presenting several "how much" or "how" concepts, consider doing so with charts, graphs, or concept diagrams. Rather than just using a bulleted list, why not use a more visual representation? There are a myriad of options available in PowerPoint, some over the top and unnecessary, but a simple chart used here and there can spice up an otherwise unfriendly presentation.

Do people retain information by reading it or by understanding connections between it and other information? It depends on their learning style. If you calculate that about half of your audience will be visual, using graphs and charts will help them, and will still reach the other half of your audience that are verbal or aural learners, or a combination of the two.

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AccuConference | All posts tagged 'excitement'

12 Ways to Get Motivated Right Now

This thing that we refer to as a “bad” day is really a personal choice to let the blues rule the day. It’s human nature to feel a little down sometimes but it still remains something that we can control.

When that day stretches into a few days or a week, there could be a bigger problem. We can see the light at the end of the tunnel, but it’s hard to keep from getting lost in the darkness. You’ve been there, I’ve been there – so what do you do? Here are 12 ways that I refocus to get motivated.

Talk to my mom.
(Also acceptable: talking to Dad) My mom gives the best advice and I love being able to sit down with her and just talk about things. Sometimes, my mom holds my hand and tells me those wonderful mom things like, “You’re so special”. Other times, my mom tells me to get over myself – which is usually exactly what I need to hear.
 
Make a playlist.
Grab yourself some new songs from iTunes or Amazon and make yourself a list of songs that make you tap your feet and get excited. Listen to those when you’re trying to get unstuck on a task.

Stop for a few minutes.
Put down your pen or iPad and step away from the keyboard. Give yourself a clean five minute break.

Do something else
.
Stuck on a task? Put it down and come back to it later.

Make a list.
When all your upcoming tasks are swirling in your head, it can feel a little overwhelming, so write them down. Cross them out as you get them done. You’ll feel better.

Change the way I’m trying to complete a task.
Trying to write a blog post on your computer and it’s just not working? Grab a pen and a notebook and try going that route. You’d be surprised how often I can be found jotting down notes or whole posts on a piece of paper.

Look at something positive.
Go back and remind yourself of something that was challenging, but you were able to get through and come out on top. That can sometimes help you remember that you’ve been down this road before – and you made it through. Find something inspirational to read.

Ask for help.
Seriously, there’s nothing wrong with this. I think we’d all be a little less frayed like a knot and spend less time rubbing our faces if we could just do this.

15 Minute Facebook break (No, seriously)
Just do something to make your mind not think about work related things. Scroll your news feed and talk to a couple of people. Give yourself a little mental break.

Change your location.
Sitting in the office trying to write a blog post? Grab your purse and go get some coffee. Change the scenery and get busy.

Go for a drive.
Now, don’t just walk out in the middle of your day at the office – that’s going to have an opposite effect, I suppose. Instead, take a little detour on your way home, or if you have the luxury to make your own schedule, just put some things on hold and get in the car. Roll down the windows, turn up the radio, and let go.

Turn off your electronic devices.
Give yourself at least 30 minutes every day without a notification or email notice. The really bad thing about email notifications is that we feel pressured to respond right away. It’s totally acceptable to read a book and relax when you’re at home – the email will wait.

Hey, we all get the blues. I’m not immune to it, none of us really are – so what kind of things do you do to get yourself feeling, well, like yourself again?


Looking for ways to improve your speaking abilities? Here are four more resources: