AccuConferenceAccuConference

Nov
18
2008
How Not To Communicate Change to Your Employees Maranda Gibson

The layoffs and the bankruptcies are clogging the national and local news these days. It's affecting more and more people as real estate, construction, and retail markets tighten for this final quarter of the year and move into an unknown 2009.

As a business owner, how do you communicate these changes to your employees? If you find yourself doing one of these things, it's time to shape up your communication skills.

1. You don't really talk about the economy, as there's work to be done. Nope. That's not a great approach. Sticking your head in the sand doesn't leave you with much to see. Your employees are looking to you to decide their future and the least you could do is to keep up on current happenings in your industry and run some numbers with your accounting department. Then call a meeting and talk about it.

2. You keep promising that nothing drastic will happen, but you just laid someone off this week. It definitely shakes the faith of your employees and it may affect your relationships with key client/customers. If you say one thing and do another, your employees may start to disregard everything you say. Far better to communicate change as a process your employees (and your clients) can track with.

3. No one knows what will happen next year, so we'll just wait it out and see. Again, why aren't you strategizing and putting forward possible plans and scenarios in case things get bigger or smaller, the economy stops completely or regains its footing? Isn't that a leader's job? If you communicate that you're thinking about these issues, wouldn't that be better all around?

4. You walk around bemoaning the loss of sales, but don't communicate how it can be fixed. Employees will wonder why the company isn't doing a major sales push or why you seem immobilized by the situation and can't move forward. Employees will begin to second-guess your leadership. It would be better to gather teams and prepare to combat lack of sales with extreme effort from everyone, most importantly, you.

5. You repeat everything the media squawks from television, radio, and Internet.
Your job is to communicate your company's message and goals at all times. If you only repeat what you hear from a media who can only spell out doom and gloom, your communication plans have been vanquished. Don't waste time repeating others' predictions. Make your own, inspire your team, and get to work.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Free eBooks

Archive

Powered by
BlogEngine.NET 2.5.0.6
Sign in